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remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes that afghanistan is a good country. and has a life of its own. it has a law of its own and has a social context of its own. in that social context afghanistan will move forward in partnership with america and also until partnership with the other countries of nato that have helped us in the past many years. will afg
is in fact what happens. this was a chronology and when the united states government announced a large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what we should be doing in light of this particular population which was different, in nationality we had not been resettling a great deal. we looked at enhancements which could bring on board that would address this new population and that's when we created the partnership with d.o. de. later >> was this in 2007? >> will yes, later when we identified a new partnership with the counter-terrorism center, that was initially focused on iraqi applicants but we learned by doing and we learned about the heightened level of checks and then we expanded to applicants of all nationalities. we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there were some 25,000 per year for a few years, isn't that right? >> i believe the high point was 18,000 ballots did you have the resources to do some kind of fairly thorough assessment of each of those 18,000 before they were able to be granted -- >> yes, sir,
the government will treat them as badly as the united states treats them or worse. there are still a few prisoners in guantanamo, the weakest from china, the chinese government. there are some in guantanamo cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the sto
in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through talks, will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. that's not for us to decide. it's an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it's the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no particular concern. when we're talking of numbers and how they are calculated. afghan interests. >>. >> translator: the government of afghanistan i would like to ask the question in my own language. mr. president, combative mission united states after 2014, how this mission will be, how will it be resembling, resembling the same mission as it was during 11 years? or is there a difference? different kind of mission. those who are in pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, wha
in the united states with their families while they work to earn green cards. as long as their relatives are u.s. citizens. the middle east tv news giant making a big move here in here e united states, al-jazeera bought current tv from former vice president al gore. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00, in with the new and out with the old. that is capitol hill hours ago, the historically unpopular 112th congress met a final time making way for the 113th congress. here is vice president biden swearing in members of the united states senate including 13 newcomers. on the other side, the house of representatives floor where new and returning members are sworn in. all eyes squarely on the embattled house speaker john boehner, the republican leader, underfire from members of his party over the troubled fiscal cliff negotiations and, too, his handling of the relief for victims of sandy. the question: would the backlash cost him the leadership job? mike, live on capitol hill. the speaker kept his job but there were defections and a lot of grum
and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was only a part of the solution. the key to reviving growth is structural reform to make the economy more competitive, as well as crucial investments in human and physical capital to ensure the next generation of grow
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
the united arabs pledged money. >> there's no milita solution. this should be resolved through political solution. french troops are gaining ground in mali. they have taken control of the airport near algeria. french troops launched an operation three weeks ago. mali is a former frempnch colon. arabs have been kidnapped suspected of having links to the rebels and they have ramsacked shops. they sent a threat in nigeria. >>> three chinese naval vsels have left for exeises i the western pacific ocean be comments fueled concerns among china ea china's neighbors over how the military will deal with the number of territory disputes. >>> people living in china know the air they have been breathing is bad. they've created a higher smog alert to track air pollution. the aunt of high particulate air has been high. an increasing number of chinese are suffering from respiratory problems. they decided to add a third level to their two-level smog alert. the highest warning now advises people to stay indoors. >> translator: i can't stand it anymore. i want to leave this place. >> translator: it's the
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a d
in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we v a series of feisty debates on the hot topics of the day. we start with president obama's nomination of senator chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. we have a clash you will want to watch. >>> then the relationship between the united states and russia keeps getting worse, whose fault is it? moscow or washington? a debate. also, the next fight in washington will be over the debt ceiling. can president obama end this craziness and bypass congress altogether? we'll talk about the out of the box solutions and whether they would work. >>> and, finally, this is the signature of the man who might be the next treasury secretary. we'll look back through history to see if there's any loopy president. speaking of secretaries of the treasury three former holders of the office and many other statesmen and women offering advice to the president on a new gps special tonight "memo to the president, road map for a second term." tonight at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> first, here's my take. chuck hagel's nomination
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
terrorists and the stakes could not be higher. this comes from a united states military commander in the united states. i'll jump across the border and tell you why the stakes could not be higher. this is pakistan in 2005. 74,000 people were killed in this earthquake. 18,000 were kids going to school. most of the kids that died were younger and female because they didn't have desks so when the walls started shaking and the roof came down they perished. there was 9,000 schools destroyed or rendered unusable. 1/2 million kids displaced out of school. in earthquake, they call it the coy mot that means this apocalypse. at first there was a very heroic effort. infer natio international community helped. after katrina red cross got 2,000,000 for help and for this earthquake red cross received 6 million dollars. the united states sent in helicopters that conductd the greatest air lift in the history of mankind. moved about 20 thousand on thes in the mountains to keep 1/2 million people a hive during the wintertime. it was very heroic and people were grateful. aid has dropped 70 percent a
years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. and we'll be sharing what that means through a new campaign we are launching over the next few weeks, which will focus on raising understanding of the unique and foundational role of the u.s. oil and natural gas industry and what it means to our economy. what it means for our communities, and for o- america's lives, for revenue, for refining, and what it means ultimately to job creation and economic recovery. oil and natural gas companies support 9.2 million jobs and could easily support an additional 1.4 million
for congress extending the borrowing authority of the united states. >> will they roll it out. >> you can speculate about a lot of things, but there's not-- nothing needs to come to these kinds of, you know, speculative notion about how to deal with a problem easily resolved by congress doing its job. very simply, since treasury, i believe, overseas printing and minting, you might ask treasury. >> at no point in-- >> and joining me now the chairman of the south carolina democratic party and mark theeson, enterprise institute and former speech writer for george w. bush. if congress doesn't give him the authority to raise the debt limit, he has the end around it with the trillion dollar coin he could just sort of say is there and allows him to spend more because we have this extra savings to really boil it down. mark, your thoughts? >> this, this may be one of the stupidest ideas ever to come out of washington and that's saying something. it's not clear it's legal. edward moy, under bush and obama may say it's legal to print a trillion dollars platinum coin, it doesn't have a trillion dolla
is of very specific importance for the united states. as was for us the issue of sovereignty and detentions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the very conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, part of it, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks and will also provide the afghan people the benefits that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. >> do you have any sense of how many troops you would be willing -- >> that's not for us to decide. it's issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it's the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues the military wi
by an unmanned u.s. plane. he was one of the top commanders. it was part of the tribal region where the united states has been targeting insurgent leaders. he has been killed with five others. we are joined from islamabad for more on who the man was. >> he was a senior commander from the south region who was active in carrying out attacks inside afghanistan. he made no secret of it. he was a respected member of the tribe. the tribe lives on both sides of the border. he offered a great help to the pakistani authorities when he took on the fallen fighters. he moved them from their territory and it enabled the pakistani military to go on a major offensive against another try. an important figure -- against another try and. tribe.her >> the strikes appear to be undermining efforts to come to a truce in the region. >> it was not just been thrown strike that killed him, but another strike that had not far away. there were two drones strikes. 10 people killed and four other people killed. a rescue is underway to see if there are any survivors. there have been questions about the thrones strikes. paki
force by the united states if we're going to protect afghanistan from falling? meaning, a central government falling, meaning a security force that's unable to secure the country. >> i think back to i re-read barbara tuckman's book. at one point a british leader asked a french leader how many troops they needed early in the war and the french leader said just one and i'll make sure he gets killed. the point he was making was commitment. i think it's less about how many american forces are there. it's actually even not important how many american dollars or technology is there. there's this intangible commitment, the idea that we are reliable. i like to describe it almost as a line of credit that a business has. they really don't want to draw on it, but having it knows that they can maintain the solvency of the business. the afghans are terrified right now. >> if we lose afghanistan, what do we really lose? people have made the point time and time again al qaeda as a threat is no longer in country, the taliban itself could be part of the government and as much as the united states
of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running sht. >> rose: other topics included the ongoing debate on gun control, and the lack of diversity in the second term appoint ease. joining me from washington al hunt of bloomberg news and from the white house major garrett of cbs news. thank you. al better i start with you. characterize for me the president in temperment and in words on the bet dealin dealing -- ceiling. >> charlie, i think he realizes he has a winning hand substantively on this and there will be caveats in just a moment. i was truck,-- struck, however that what this really, his last press conference his first term showed he should have had a lot more than he did. because he's rusty. if was almost analogy can be made to that first debate. he went on too long for a while. he stepped on his narrative some. and if you read t i think reads better than it looked. the reason i say i think he believes he has the upper hand on the debt sealing is because republicans have a losing hand. they don't want to hold the full faith an
>> barack obama is projected to be the next president of the united states. >> tonight ofrontline... >> they thought success would breed success. >> we'll move for a quick kill-- that's how they referred to it, "a quick kill on capitol hill." >> their leadership told the members, "no, just say no." >> there was a polarizing quality about barack obama that came roaring forward. >> he was in a position to make demands, and he didn't. >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> i think he understands that the glory days are over and everything's going to be more challenging. >> now he gets another chance to be the guy who united the country. >> in the week before his inauguration, a look back "inside obama's presidency." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.
and the investigative authority within the united states. we would be helpless if we did not work with dhs, cia, nsa, and the rest of the intelligence community. if there is one substantial change that has made the biggest difference, i would say breaking down the traditional walls between the intelligence community and the domestic law enforcement community because information flows very easily over borders now, and you cannot just see one piece of the puzzle without getting the other piece. it has made a tremendous difference and given rise to the approach from all of us that says we want to work together in a task force context. >> for our radio listeners, you are listening to the commonwealth club of california radio program. our guest today is fbi director robert muller discussing security threats concerning the united states. we would like to ask you a little bit about the national security implications of our energy policy, an issue of much concern in the news and certainly here in silicon valley. what might you say about the relationship between energy policy and some of the national securit
. [applause] >> if you get sick and choose to go to the united states, you have a higher risk of medical error. the cures for aids and alzheimer's will come from america, not canada. >> imagine a world without religious faith. not just no place to worship, no prayer, no scripture, but no men or women who, because of their faith, dedicate their lives to others. >> over us to supervise this. a celestial dictatorship. a kind of divine north korea. [laughter] >> i can't believe i'm about to say this, but dr. kissinger, you have six minutes. >> i think that is the kind of hypocritical argument i would find quite annoying. [laughter] >> you obviously finding it annoying even if you are not chinese. [laughter] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the munk debates on iran. [cheers and applause] this is munk's debates on iran's nuclear ambitions. it is my privilege to organize this series and once again at as your moderate. we begin with a look back, a look back of some of the memorable moments of previous debates. tonight is a special evening for this series. tonight is our 10th semiannual munk d
, france, and the united states, and britain. >> many of the people i've worked in the area many years. i asked for your understanding for not being able to give you more detailed information. >> it's not clear how many algerian workers are being held. least 30 people have managed to escape. a catering company said that it has 150 employees alone still confined at the plant. the gas field is in remote parts of the country's eastern desert, serviced by its own air fields, accommodations, and hospital. several hundred people are believed to work on the base at any one time. it's just 100 kilometers west of the libyan border. one armed group says it carried out the attack as payback for algeria allowing france to use its air bases in the assault against al qaeda dazzling spiders in neighboring mali. >> according to the information we have, there are about 20 terrorists inside. we believe they take orders from him and i don't believe they came from mali or libya. this is a revenge attack aimed at foreign countries participating in the attacks in mali. >> that is an excuse. usually, operations
forces, and by following those roles, military personnel have combated unit -- immunity. you killed during combat, it is not murder. you have a community as a combatant. collateral damage is a corollary of that. if you drop a bomb and it kills the bad guy and some guys around them, as long as you applied the principles of laws of war, then those deaths are collateral damage. the cia has a drone program, and that is a civilian agency with civilian contractors that are not part of the military. the laws of war do not apply. they do not have competitive community. collateral damage does not apply absent combative community. i'm not sure where we get the authority to send civilians around the world to commit what i believe is murder. we finally have the catalyst in which -- the kill list -- when president obama campaign in 2008, he talked about a bush had got rid of our values, but i do not recall that president bush had to kill list determining when an american needs to die without trial. i'm hopeful that these will get reexamined in a second term. president obama met the plane carryin
people and the united states but of the entire region. and finally we reaffirmed the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, an enduring partnership between two sovereign nations. this includes deepening ties with trade, commerce, strengthening institutions, development, education, and opportunities for all afghans. men and women, boys and girls. and this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governance and development that delivers for the afghan people and an end to safe havengs for al qaeda and its ilk. all this will continue to be our work. but make no mistake. our path is clear and we are moving forward. every day more afgha
is no other options which is true because congress said you cannot bring them and prosecute them in the united states. so we have created the obstacles that make military commissions. we create our own justifications. it is because of the abusive treatment and detentions and if you peel it back, it's not about what they did to us, it's about what we did to them that makes military commissions seem like an attractive option. and you can't have trained police. i think the public knows that that is the case. every person that was apprehended on the battlefield -- i can't think of any but khalid sheikh mohammed and abu zubaydah were arrested while in pakistan. there were others arrested in dubai and somalia. we have to have this special forum about the battlefield conditions is a great part of this second rate process that is more about less will go what we are bringing to court. another part of the issue is the senate select committee who has completed their report. and also john mccain and dianne feinstein concluded that torture does not work. and it's a stain on our reputation. i think that it'
karzai. we're there for the benefit of the united states. as long as there is a threat that comes from afghanistan, al qaeda, as long as afghanistan could be in the future used as a potential safe haven against people in the united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there.safee united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there. and we have to remember first principles. we're there for the defense of the american mainland and american people. >> always good to get your thoughts. appreciate it, sir. >> take care. >>> in december russias passed a law banning u.s. adoptions. that left hundreds in limbo wondering what were happening to the children they were already in the process of adopting. now there may be some hope for those people. >>> one problem after another this week if boeing 787 dream liner. now the u.s. government weighing in. >>> also coming up, it is the first and only exhibition of its kind to ever tour the united states featuring 150 mummies. fr r. clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've got nine grams of protein. that's three times
to the next president of the united states. this was a different man. >> there are tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands who have gathered in grant park in chicago. >> ladies and gentlemen, the next first family of the united states of america. >> narrator: only four years earlier, he'd been a state legislator. >> the look on his face to me looked like someone who finally understood the weight of the job that he had just won. >> almost as if the weight of the world had rested on his shoulders. >> the road ahead will be long, our climb will be steep. two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century. but america, i have never been more hopeful than i am tonight that we will get there. i promise you, we as a people will get there. god bless you, and may god bless the united states of america. >> narrator: if he had any idea that night how difficult this would be, the next day would prove it. >> so much for that election day euphoria... >> the economy has now lost 650,000 jobs just in the past three months... >> all eyes are now on barack obama to turn it around...
. looking at conflicts of the organization's and workspace united states, often not the most crucial to those on the ground and sometimes it is difficult to understand. those other questions that they ask. who can i trust? to can i not trust? sow developed a policy that is the question we have to ask what about the relationship of foreign fighters? what kind? overtime there is a pretty good relationship without chitin and i imagine they would point* to the relationship over time that they clashed repeatedly with millicent's and as a result he clashed with other taliban elements in south waziristan. stability of that organization we have to get down to the fine point* how he frames his politics. for. have aggressively do they target people in afghanistan? this is pretty obvious. he supported troops from afghanistan but that is not the case for every militant network fare pretty -- many criminal networks that fought other militant organizations. it is a key question for policy going forward have the pakistan restate looks at the organization's. it is important to us but not the i s i h
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
conflicts in the north. i'm not sure the united states has [indiscernible] >> thank you. great question. first and foremost, we recognize that it is not only the u.s., it is not our responsibility do just that, not the primary people. that must reside with the nigerian government. it we tried to take the lead, we would not get it right. we do not understand the context. we are americans and not nigerians. it would be difficult for us to be effective. our focus has been working through our u.s. ambassador with the nigerians to say, what can we do to help you? we think that is the right approach. we have an ongoing dialogue with the nigerian officials on what types of support might be helpful. for my comment about mali, there are numerous nigerian officers and noncommissioned officers who trained with us for a year in the united states and other programs across europe. we think that is a good endeavor. we are talking with the nigerians. they made some specific request to help them. some of the lessons that we have learned in iraq and afghanistan in countering improvised explosive devices,
. this was a chronology, and when the united states government announced large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what should we be doing in light of this particular population, which was different, the nation out of we've not been reselling a great deal. we look at what enhancement we could bring on board that would address this new population. and that's when we create the partnership with dod. initially that was iraqi focused. later when we work with the national -- >> was this in 2007? >> 2007. later when we identified additional capacity a new partnership, that initially was focus on iraq at because but we learn by doing that was learned that heightened level of checks which was initially oriented towards iraqi applicants, we expand to applicants of all nationality. so really we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there was some 20, 25,000 a year for a features are coming out of iraq. is that about right? >> i believe the high point is 18,000. >> i mean, that still 18,000 a year. did you have the resources and capacity to
of questions already are coming from the united states about the algerian government's tactics in the operation that could have put the hostages in jeopardy. now, we also want to let you know that right now, there's a chartered flight en route of bp employees from algeria. it is headed towards london to gatwick airport. now, that could be landing at any moment. we don't yet know if the passengers are any of the freed hostages or if there are americans on board, but as we get that information, we're going to share that with you. the brother of an irish national who escaped from captivity had a harrowing story. he spoke to cnn today and described what happened to his brother. >> yeah, but just found out recently that he'd been mered to sleep with duct tape over his mouth and his hands tied and then we find out how he got free and five out of the compound or to a different part of the compound, and there were five jeeps and the algerian army had bombeded the jeeps and out of the five jeeps, the bomb had wiped out four of them. and they had obviously lost their lives, but lucky enough for my brothe
five of australia's six states. meanwhile, the united states records its hottest year ever. we will go to australia for report. three men of somali descent are arraigned in new york. president obama continues the controversial practice of rendition, secretly detaining, transporting, and holding prisoners overseas. part two of our exclusive interview with sami al-hajj, the of jazeera journalist imprisoned and tortured at guantanamo for six years. >> when i was in guantanamo, i asked myself maybe it is a good chance for me to be a journalist in guantanamo to be a witness. [indiscernible] >> we speak with the al jazeera journalist at al jazeera headquarters in doha, qatar. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. new figures have confirmed 2012 was the hottest year on record for the continental united states. on tuesday, the national oceanic and atmospheric administration announced an average temperature for 2012 of 55.3 degrees, one degree above the previous record and 3.2 degrees more than the 20th century ave
swear. >> i do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. g> four years after making history by becoming the first african-american president, barack obama kicks off the second term on martin luther king day. today and inauguration day special. we will air highlights from last ides' peace ball including naacp president benjamin jealous. >> the challenge for our country is never to see the day when a person of color would be president, nor the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to have -- happen again and again. >> we'll also hear from the legendary poet son the sanchez, ralph nader, sweet honey and the rock, and angela davis. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential agenda. >> we will look at big money behind the inauguration. four years ago president obama refused to accept corporate donations, but this year exxonmobil, at&t, christoph are among the biggest backers of today's festivities. -- microsoft are among the biggest backers of today's
destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >> it is a necessary struggle. we cannot permit northern mali to become a safe haven. people say to me all the
ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
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